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© 2019 WOW ATTRACTIONS

Division of MARK BELL ENTERTAINMENT, INC. 

All rights reserved.

LOOP RAWLINS' ONE MAN WILD WEST SHOW

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LOOP RAWLINS is one of the smoothest and highly technical western performers in the world today, showcasing award winning mastery in trick roping, whip cracking and gun spinning.

LOOP RAWLINS' ONE MAN WILD WEST SHOW is a modern performance that puts on display his mastered skills from the Wild West. This makes for a spectacular show that appeals to a 21st century audience. Loop Rawlins features the traditional Western skills of rope spinning, whip cracking and gun spinning in his high energy performances, which are choreographed with edgy pop and country music. 

Loop is from Tuscon, AZ and observed the art of trick roping for the first time at the age of 8. Fascinated, Loop began to learn a few basic tricks with ropes of his own. Loop joined the Will Rogers Trick Roping Group when he turned 13, where he was inspired by his teacher, who gave him tips and inspired him to practice more.

At age 14, after countless hours of practice, Loop was asked to perform rope tricks for a live audience. This experience led Loop to take up two additional Western arts: whip cracking and gun spinning. In 2002, Loop entered an international competition at the Wild West Arts Convention in Las Vegas, and won five awards.

Loop is also the first Western performer to be featured in Cirque Du Soleil and performed in 2014 as a semi-finalist on America's Got Talent. 

Loop continues to perform for audiences all over the world, entertaining for fairs, festivals and corporate events with high energy skills and charisma. 

 

CONTACT US if you want LOOP RAWLINS to perform for your next event!

 

The History of the WESTERN ARTS

 

THE HISTORY OF THE WESTERN ARTS

TRICK ROPING

Roping originated with the raising of cattle and livestock, one of man's oldest occupation. Before the cowboys could get their hands on ropes, it is documented that in 480 B.C. the Samaritans, men in the ancient Persian Cavalry, were expert ropers. In war, they would encircle their opponent, pulling them off their horse. While Loop does not demonstrate this exact skill in his show, he does have plenty of awe-inspiring rope tricks and skills.

​When Spain colonized in America, they taught the settlers how to rope. However, the first account of trick rope spinning was in a book written in the early 1800's on ranch life in Mexico. The book stated that "in the hands of certain vaqueros (cowboys), the rope could be made to do strange and wondrous things." Maybe that is why Loop Rawlins was so fascinated when he first saw the art of the lasso. In photos from the 1880s, you can see performers in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show spinning ropes. Trick roping transformed into an entertaining art that is both challenging and visually stunning.

WHIP CRACKING

Whips have been around in one form or another for as long as recorded history has existed. If you look at reproductions of ancient hieroglyphics, you will see many depictions of rulers with their arms crossed across their chests, holding a staff or religious symbol in one hand and a whip in the other. This is not the kind of whip we know today as the bullwhip. 

Bullwhips are primarily used for herding cattle. When a whip cracks, the end of the whip called the cracker travels around 750-900 mph, breaking the speed of sound and creating a sonic boom. Cowboys used the sound of the whip to move cattle. Later, whip cracking transformed into an art form with different tricks and techniques. To this day, they hold championships in whip cracking. Loop Rawlins won the title of world champion in the style and technique competition at the WWAC in 2002.

FANCY GUN SPINNING

Gun spinning does not date back as far as ropes or whips, but it does come directly from the Wild West. When Samuel L. Colt created the Colt Peacemaker, it was revolutionary. It was the gun that 'Won the West' and was the firearm that many cowboys heroes, villains and legends used. Considering the fact that the gun was so well balanced and that the trigger guard was so smooth, it is safe to say a cowboy probably spun his gun. It is also safe to say that cowboys sometimes probably forgot to unload it before spinning, resulting in an accident. Gun spinning became popular in Western movies, where a gunfighter would shoot his opponent then spin the pistol back into his holster. The most popular scene of gun spinning is from the movie Tombstone, in the saloon when Johnny Ringo shows off his gun spinning.